Monthly Archives: March 2018

Movie Poster Collecting

There is a great deal of history behind movie posters and movie poster collecting. Jules Cheret, who created 2 movie posters in the 1890’s, was the artist given credit for creating the first movie posters. By the end of the first decade of the 1900’s, movies had become a great source of public entertainment. In this time period, the movie poster would become a standard size known as the one sheet measuring 27″ x 41″.

In the early days, the names of actors did not appear on the posters, which the movie studios liked, because it meant paying actors less money. It was in this early period in movie history, however, that movie studios realized movie stars were as much of an attraction to the moviegoer as the movie itself. Thus, the movie star was born, and movie posters began showcasing actors’ names along with the title of the movie.

By the 1920’s, the golden age of silent movies, movie posters became more artistic and spectacular, with accomplished artists being hired by movie studios to paint portraits of the stars for posters. By the late 1920’s, movie poster images became sharper due to a new printing process developed by the Morgan Litho Company.

In the 1930’s, also known in the movie industry as “The Golden Age of Movies”, another style of movie poster was created, the half sheet. Major movies would sometimes get more than the two styles. However, due to the depression, many movie materials were being created more cheaply, causing a loss of quality in movie posters.

The dawn of World War II in 1941 saw many of the movie stars heading off to war and war was the major theme of movies at that time. The movie industry cut advertising costs and used cheaper paper for posters due to the paper shortage of wartime.

By the 1970’s, movie posters used photography, occasionally using drawing and painting styles. Movie posters at this time were being printed on a clay-coated paper, which gave them a glossy finish. Star Wars and Star Trek posters were the most popular posters of the time and are still collected by many today.

In the 1980’s, the age of the special effects blockbuster, the mini sheet was invented, and video stores became popular, thus the video store poster was created. Today, reprints of movie posters are mass-produced and sold in many stores or are just a click away on the Internet.There are several types of movie posters. Because of their rarity, the avid movie poster collector has concentrated on movie poster or theater art. These are the posters that are delivered and displayed by the movie theaters and then intended to be thrown away. Another type of movie poster is the commercial poster, which is mass-produced for direct sale to the public. Video posters are distributed to video rental stores for advertising material. Cable and TV posters are use as promotional material for TV stations for their programming. Like theater art, video posters and cable and TV posters are not produced for the public. Although not as valuable as theater art, these types of posters are still popular among collectors. Special promotion posters promote a movie along with a product. Finally, there are anniversary issues, limited editions, and special releases that are released in limited quantities and are gaining favor with the theatre art collector. Other types of movie posters include advance posters that promote a movie well ahead of the movie’s release. The award poster, which indicates that a movie has won an Academy award. The combo poster, advertising two movies instead of just one. The popular double-sided poster that has art on both sides, with the artwork reversed on one side of the poster. There are featurette posters highlighting short films or cartoons, review posters for when a movie gets a good review, serial posters for movie serials, and special distribution posters.

With the popularity of movie posters has come the necessity to create various sizes of posters. The first and most widely used poster is the one sheet, which is usually 27″ x 41″. The subway, also known as the two sheet, is larger but not exactly two times the size of the one sheet. The 3 sheet is three times the size of the one sheet measuring at 41″ x 81″. The 6 sheet is six times the size of the one sheet measuring of 81″ x 81″. There is also a 12 sheet approximately twelve times the size of a one sheet, and the colossal sized 24 sheet measuring 246″ x by 108″. Other sizes include the mini sheet, which is usually much smaller than the one sheet and comes in a variety of sizes, and the stock sheet issued for cartoons or other shorts.

As with all collectibles, condition is a great factor when placing a value on posters. A movie poster’s value is determined by demand, rarity, and condition. Poster collectors use the same grade system used by comic book collectors: mint (perfect), near mint, very good, good, fair, and poor.

For those who want to be serious movie poster collectors, you will need to know some things about taking care of your movie poster art.

Tips to retain the total collectable value of movie posters
Never alter the appearance of a poster. Do not fold, bend, tear, or punch holes in it even to hang it on your wall.

Never place a movie poster in direct sunlight. UV lights can also be harmful.

Don’t write on your poster, even on the back. Marks on the back can sometimes be seen from the other side, taking away from the poster’s value.

Never put tape on the front of a poster even to repair tears. If you do use tape, use acid free tape available from an art supply shop, and place the tape on the back. For expensive movie art take it to a professional to be restored. Posters can be restored the same way rare comic books are professionally restored.

An Ideal Personalized Present

Finding the ideal gift can often be a difficult chore. If you find that you tend to run out of ideas for what to give your friends and loved ones, this article about movie gift baskets is for you. The baskets are ideal gift-giving solutions, and you’ll actually have fun preparing them. They are so versatile that they can be given for all occasions and you can personalize them to please and delight everyone you offer them to. After all, everyone derives pleasure from watching movies while eating their favorite snacks.

Movie gift baskets are perfect romantic Valentine’s Day gifts, for example. Prepare a basket containing your special girl’s favorite chocolate, popcorn and / or candy and one or two romantic movies you know she’ll enjoy. The Internet is a great place to look if you’re not sure which movies to buy. Your friend is bound to appreciate the thoughtfulness of personalized movie gift baskets, and you’ll spend a lovely evening together right at home. Don’t forget to stock up on your favorite drinks too.

These gifts don’t always have to be romantic. This is one gift idea that you can adapt to any occasion. Rather than mindlessly buying flowers for sick relatives or friends, show how much you care by offering them movie gift baskets. Simply fill up a basket with small snacks or fruit and add a couple of funny movies to raise the spirits of the ill person and help him / her to get better. Boredom often aggravates a bed-ridden person’s condition, and movie gift baskets are an excellent way to fill up the long hours and raise the spirits of any depressed patient. Making an effort to find out which kinds of movies the person prefers and including those in your basket will make it a memorable gift that will be even more appreciated.

Baskets containing candy, popcorn and a selection of scary movies are perfect to offer your friends on Halloween too. Christmas and Easter are other occasions when movie baskets can come to the rescue! There’s nothing easier than making a Christmas movie gift basket. Holiday season candies and great Christmas movies are available everywhere. Choose classic Christmas movies for older people and movies like ‘The polar Express’ for children. Gift baskets for Easter can contain things like colored jelly beans and bunny-shaped Easter chocolate, plus religious movies or any traditional entertainment movie you know our friends enjoy. As you can see, movie gift baskets are the ultimate personalized, fun to make presents for everyone, at any time!

In fact, you may find yourself making up your own special occasions just for the fun of preparing them. One idea, budget permitting, is an ‘Academy Awards Night’. Prepare gifts that contain popcorn flavors and one or more of the Academy Awards nominated movies. Another idea would be setting up a ‘Classic Movie Night’ where the baskets would hold some of your and your friends’ favorite old movies. You could even ask your friends to chip in and make these on a monthly basis, enjoying a movie night in your homes on rotating schedule. These baskets can also keep family members happy if you go on vacation to a place where television channels don’t offer much to see.

There’s really no limit to what you can add to movie gift baskets. Personalize them to suit both the occasion and the people who will be using them. In addition to popcorn and movies, you can include such things as movie guide booklets, plastic forks for greasy popcorn, paper napkins, nuts and lollipops; the list is endless.

Video Games Turned Movies

If you ever see the name “Alan Smithee” in the credits of a movie, it means the real director thought the movie was so bad, they didn’t want their name in it.

Gamers know that a lot of video games are based off of movies, such as Fantastic 4, Chronicles of Riddick, Batman, Superman–the list can go on and on. But what about movies based off of video games? How did they do? Below is a list of games turned into movies over the past ten years, how they did and a prediction of game-to-movie projects in the future.The first of these was Super Mario Brothers. Made back in 1993, it is a weak interpretation of the game in which Dennis Hopper plays King Koopa, an evolved dinosaur. There was not much of a plot line and the movie was an agonizing 140 minutes long. The audiences felt the same way too as the movie bombed in the box office. This however didn’t stop Hollywood from producing many more video game-to-movie adaptations such as: Final Fantasy The Spirits Within, the Mortal Kombat series, the Tomb Raider series and the most recent Doom. In 1995 the Mortal Kombat series was next to hit the big screen. Based much more on the fan based games it still had no real plot and seemed more like an old fashion kung fu movie then a big budget movie.

Next came Tomb Raider in 2001, based on the game back in 1996. This movie was a very good interpretation of the game, which included exploration, treasure, monsters and, most importantly, Lara Croft, played by Agelina Jolie. Jolie looked the part of Lara Croft as well as any human could, hence a huge reason the movie did well is that it had a watchable character and a good story line. Because of these aspects, the Tomb Raider movies set a new trend for future video game-to-movies.

Final Fantasy The Spirits Within, made in 2001, was not really based upon the games but more the philosophies behind the games, namely parallel universes and the existence of spirits. However the reason the movie lost $120 million dollars was not the plot but the GC animation. True, the character mapping and texture shading was revolutionary for its time in the film industry, but because of the use of CG it failed to induce emotion with the characters’ eyes and faces, which in turn equated to bad acting and a flop in the box office.

Resident Evil, in 2002, tried a different approach in its adaptation in which it tried to have many different subplots to capture the viewer’s attention. Did it work? No. The problem here was that Resident Evil turned into more of an action movie then a horror/thriller like the games where. The movie itself was really not that scary, had only zombies, mutant dogs and the Licker (the only real monster in the movie) so it is needless to say how this movie did in the box office.

Then there was Doom. Not the 1st of 1st person shooters, but it was the baddest. The Doom series has been scenario time and time again. You are a space marine on mars with a mission to close Hell’s portal along with a massive arsenal of weapons like the rocket launcher and chainsaw. One would think the producers could generate a decent script from the material in the video games, but I guess the producers must have been out to lunch because there was no reference to Hell in the movie. Instead it was DNA experiments gone wrong on Mars. Instead of killing demons, the marines killed zombies. Civilians by the hundreds were killed, whereas in the video game only monsters were killed. Another flop we will have to wait and see.

In Silent Hill a key scene is when the heroine is told to memorize a map and the directions are simply left, left, right, right in nature to navigation through a maze within the movie. What make the video game so popular was the ability for the player to make his or her own choices within the game, whereas in the movie there is only one choice when diminishes the games flare.